How to Import from LastPass

Everything you save in LastPass can be imported into Dashlane : Passwords, IDs, Notes, Credit cards, Passports, Profiles, Emails, etc...

How to export from LastPass and import to Dashlane

There are two steps for importing your data from LastPass into Dashlane

Step 1. Exporting from Lasspass and importing all your passwords, credit cards, IDs, notes and all other data

In your browser, click on the LastPass extension icon in the toolbar and select Tools → Advanced Tools → Export To → LastPass CSV file in the menu.

Enter your LastPass master password.

If, at this point, LastPass opens a new tab in your browser containing your data, click here to jump directly to the second chapter of this article.

Otherwise, choose a location and file name for the CSV file that is being exported then click Save.

Make sure you do not remove the .csv extension when changing the name of the file. If needed, copy and paste the whole text to a text editor application then save the file with a .csv file extension.

Now open the Dashlane application and select File → Import passwords → LastPass in the menu bar at the top of the window.

Lastly, select your exported .csv file and click on Import.

Then Dashlane will tell you how many passwords and other data (IDs, secure notes, credit cards, etc) have been successfully imported to Dashlane. Note that only your passwords will be in the Passwords section of Dashlane. Other items will be found in the other sections of Dashlane. For instance, credit cards will appear in the Payments section, and your notes will be in the Secure Notes section.

Note: if Dashlane cannot place an item in one of the sections, then it will place if by default in the Secure Notes section. Please check this section if you are looking for some of your data.

Step 2. Importing your Form Filling Profiles

In your browser, click on the LastPass extension icon in the toolbar and select Tools → Advanced Tools → Export To → Form fill profiles in the menu.

Enter your LastPass master password.

Now, choose a location and file name for the CSV file then click Save.

Make sure you do not remove the .csv extension when changing the name of the file. If needed, copy and paste the whole text to a text editor application then save the file with a .csv file extension.

Now open the Dashlane application and select File → Import passwords → LastPass in the menu bar at the top of the window.

Lastly, select your exported .csv file and click on Import.

Dashlane will now tell you how many form fill profiles it managed to import on this window. Click on Import.

You will then find your LastPass form filler profiles in the Personal Info section of Dashlane. Click here to learn more about the Contact section.

Important: After importing your data to Dashlane, do not forget to delete the two unsecured .csv files that were exported from LastPass!

If LastPass opens a tab in your browser when exporting your data

Depending on your version of LastPass, a new tab may open in your browser when exporting your LastPass data. It will look like this:

If it happens, select the whole content of the window and copy the data and paste it into a plain text file in your favorite text editor (for instance: NotePad on Windows, TextEdit on Mac OS X).

Then save the document as a .csv file. You can do this by adding the .csv extension to the name of the file when saving it. For instance, if you want to name your file "Passwords from LastPass.txt", name it "PasswordsFromLastPass.csv" instead.

Now follow the procedure below to import it into Dashlane:

Open the Dashlane application and select File → Import passwords → LastPass in the menu at the top of the window.

Select your .csv file and click on Import.

Then Dashlane will tell you how many passwords and other data (IDs, secure notes, credit cards, etc) have been successfully imported to Dashlane. Note that only your passwords will be in the Passwords section of Dashlane. Other items will be found in the other sections of Dashlane. For instance, credit cards will appear in the Payments section, and your notes will be in the Secure Notes section.

Note: if Dashlane cannot place an item in one of the sections, then it will place if by default in the Secure Notes section. Please check this section if you are looking for some of your data.

Important: After importing your data to Dashlane, do not forget to delete the unsecured .csv files!

If Dashlane does not find anything to import

Check that all your password items have a site address

If you saved your passwords to LastPass without the URL (website address), these passwords will not be imported to Dashlane.

To import these passwords into Dashlane, you need to:

  • either add a URL for these password items in LastPass before exporting your data again,
  • or either add a URL for these password items manually to your .csv file so that Dashlane can import the passwords.

To add them manually to your .csv file, please open your .csv file and check that the first row looks like this:

  • url,username,password,extra,name,grouping,fav

Here is an example of what the first two lines of your file should look like:

  • url,username,password,extra,name,grouping,fav
  • www.facebook.com,me@email.com,password123,note,Facebook,Social Media,0

Check that your data is properly formatted

If you did not specify a note or a category/grouping for an item, you can leave them empty. However, make sure to keep or add all the commas in each row, as the commas are used as delimiters. For example:

  • url,username,password,extra,name,grouping,fav
  • www.twitter.com,me@email.com,password123,,Twitter,,
  • www.ello.co,username,password456,,Ello,Social Media,

Check for inconsistencies in your .csv file

Remove any "iterations=500;" that you may see written at the start of each row in your .csv file.

Then save your .csv file and try to import it again.

If Chrome is your default browser

You might also want to try exporting your passwords in Firefox, as several of our users have reported problems using Chrome to export your data from LastPass.

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